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The photographs of the series Paris, nothing new could have been taken in the 1950s, and this is probably due to the fact that I am still using argentic films and paper, and also avoiding what I dislike: modern cars, plastic bags, track suits. Using argentic process when numeric is so easy can probably be regarded as an extravagance, it is time consuming, expensive and a lot more complicated than numeric. But the slow revelation of the image, the time elapsed between the shooting and the viewing of the print are for me essential steps in the process of artistic creation.

The black line shows that the photographs have not been cropped, and it is a framework which sets the limits and the rules; within that framework one can choose not to follow the rules; what I have learned from Saul Leiter is that you don’t always need the tension of the decisive moment, it is good also to have some photographs which are more peaceful.

I have always done the same thing, always taken the same sort of photographs. But I often kept some photographs without showing them, developed but not printed, assuming that nobody would be interested. Now I dare show them, since I heard Charles Zalber, owner of the gallery Lucie Weill & Seligmann in Paris, say that I was able to make a photograph “out of nothing”I value the idea that something can be beautiful without being complicated or sophisticated.

I used to meet Edouard Boubat quite often, by chance, either when we were taking photographs in the same areas of Paris or at the laboratory where we were both clients. I asked him once if I could show him some of my photographs, he accepted very kindly and told me after: “At the end of the day, we are all doing the same thing…”

A selection of 35 photographs of the series Paris, nothing new has been exhibited at The Rangefinder Gallery, Chicago, in August 2016 and February 2017. The photographs are gelatin silver (16 x 12 ") printed by Toros Aladjajian.